Retro 11 Columbia Gs Essay

MottoLux in Tenebris Lucet[1]

Motto in English

The light that shines in the darkness
TypePrivate
Established1947
DeanLisa Rosen-Metsch
Students2,394
Address408 Lewisohn Hall
New York, New York, U.S.
CampusMorningside Heights Campus,
urban, 36 acres (0.15 km2; 0.056 sq mi)
AffiliationsJuilliard School, Sciences Po, City University of Hong Kong, Trinity College Dublin, and Albert A. List College (Jewish Theological Seminary of America)
Websitegs.columbia.edu

The Columbia University School of General Studies (GS) is a highly selective liberal arts college and one of the three official undergraduatecolleges of Columbia University, situated on the university's main campus in Morningside Heights, New York City.[2] GS is known primarily for its traditional B.A. degree program for non-traditional students (those who have had an academic break of one year or more, or are pursuing dual-degrees). GS students make up almost 30% of the Columbia undergraduate population.

GS is an Ivy League college that offers dual-degree programs with multiple leading universities around the world.[3][4] It offers dual degree programs with Sciences Po in France, the City University of Hong Kong, Trinity College Dublin (University of Dublin) in Ireland, and List College of the Jewish Theological Seminary.[3] It also offers dual degree programs with the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the School of International and Public Affairs. GS is the historical home to dual-degree programs at Columbia University,[4] and the Post-baccalaureate Premedical Program.

GS is fully integrated into the traditional undergraduate curriculum at Columbia and shares the same courses, Core Curriculum, faculty, and degree as Columbia College.[5][6]

Numerous GS students have gone on to win prestigious fellowships, including the Rhodes Scholarship, the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, and the Fulbright Scholarship. Since 2010 (and until 2017-2018), GS has been the only undergraduate college at Columbia to produce any Rhodes Scholars.[7] Notable alumni include Nobel Prize winners Simon Kuznets and Baruj Benacerraf, as well as Isaac Asimov, J.D. Salinger, Amelia Earhart, and Princess Firyal of Jordan.

History[edit]

Predecessor Institutions[edit]

GS's evolutionary ancestor is the now-defunct, all-male Seth Low Junior College, which was established in Downtown Brooklyn in 1928 to help alleviate the flood of Jewish applicants to Columbia College. The entrance requirements for Seth Low Junior College were reportedly the same as those enforced in Columbia College.[8] Following completion of the two-year program, graduates could complete their undergraduate degrees at the University's professional schools, such as the School of Law, Business School, or School of Engineering and Applied Science (all of which conferred terminal bachelor's degrees at the time) or earn B.S. degrees in the liberal arts as University Undergraduates.[9]

Seth Low Junior College was closed in 1938 due to the adverse economic effects of the Great Depression and concomitant popularity of the tuition-free Brooklyn College in 1930. Henceforth, its remaining students were absorbed into the Morningside Heights campus as students in the University Undergraduate program in University Extension, which was established by Nicholas Murray Butler in 1904. University Extension was responsible for the founding of three schools at Columbia: the School of General Studies, School of Business, and the School of Dental and Oral Surgery (now the College of Dental Medicine). The School of Continuing Education (now the School of Professional Studies) was later established to reprise University Extension's former role.[10][11][12]

The Establishment of the School of General Studies[edit]

With an influx of students attending the University on the GI Bill following the resolution of World War II, in December 1946, the University Undergraduate program was reorganized as an official undergraduate college for "qualified students who, because of employment or for other reasons, are unable to attend other schools of the University." Columbia University pioneered the use of the term "General Studies" when naming the college, adapting the medieval term for universities, "Studium Generale."[13][14][15] Thus, the School of General Studies bears no semblance to general studies or extension studies programs at other universities in the United States. In December 1968, the University Council permitted GS to grant the B.A. degree instead of the B.S. degree, making it only one of two colleges at Columbia offering the B.A. degree.[16]

Merging of Columbia College and General Studies Faculties[edit]

In 1991, the Columbia College (CC), School of General Studies (GS), and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) faculties were merged into the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, which resulted in the complete academic integration between the School of General Studies and Columbia College.[17][18] As a result, both GS and CC students receive B.A. degrees conferred by the Trustees of Columbia University through the Faculty of Art & Sciences,[18] and GS is recognized as an official liberal arts college at Columbia University.

Academics[edit]

GS students make up almost 30% of the Columbia undergraduate population and have been known to consistently earn the highest average GPAs among undergraduates at Columbia University.[19][20][21] Approximately 20% of GS students are part-time students who have significant, full-time work commitments in addition to their academic responsibilities (which is also the case for some full-time students).[22] Since 2010 (and until 2017), GS has been the only undergraduate college at Columbia University to produce any Rhodes Scholars.[23][24][25][26]

The School of General Studies confers the degree of Bachelor of Arts in more than 70 majors.[1] All GS students are required to complete the Core Curriculum, which includes University Writing, Literature/Humanities, Contemporary Civilization/Social Science, Art Humanities, Music Humanities, Global Core, Quantitative Reasoning, Science, and Foreign Language.[27]

In addition to its bachelor's degree program, the School of General Studies offers combined undergraduate/graduate degree programs with Columbia's Schools of Law, Business, Dental Medicine, Social Work, International and Public Affairs, Teachers College, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, as well as undergraduate dual-degree programs with the Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Jewish Theological Seminary, and the Dual BA Program Between Columbia University and the French University Sciences Po.[28]

Admission[edit]

Admission to Columbia GS is highly selective and "extremely competitive."[29] The SAT score range (25th-75th percentiles) for admitted students is 1330–1530 out of 1600 on the new SAT (680-770 on Reading and Writing, and 650-760 on Math). The average GPA of admitted students is 3.9/4.0.

Admission requires an online application, official high school (or GED) transcripts, SAT or ACT test scores within the past eight years or a score on the General Studies Admissions Examination,[30] an essay of 1,500-2,000 words, and two recommendation letters.[31] Interviews are conducted in person and over phone.

Eligibility[edit]

Prospective Columbia undergraduates who have had a break of a year or more in their education, have already completed an undergraduate degree (and intend to pursue studies in a different discipline), or are pursuing dual undergraduate degrees are considered non-traditional and eligible to apply to GS. Applicants in extenuating circumstances which preclude them from attending Columbia College full-time are also eligible.[32][33] GS students have the option to attend part- or full-time.[34]

Dual Degree Programs[edit]

Dual BA with Sciences Po[edit]

The Dual BA Program is a unique and highly selective program in which undergraduate students earn two Bachelor of Arts degrees in four years from both Columbia University and Sciences Po, one of the most prestigious universities in France and Europe.[35] This program is geared towards traditionally-aged applicants in high school, and is one of the most selective undergraduate programs in the nation.[36]

Students spend two years at one of three Sciences Po campuses in France (Le Havre, Menton, or Reims), each of which is devoted to a particular region of the world. At Sciences Po, undergraduates can pursue majors in political science, economics, law, finance, history, among others. After two years at Sciences Po, students matriculate at Columbia University, where they complete the Core Curriculum and one of over 70 majors offered at Columbia. Graduates of the program are guaranteed admission to a Sciences Po graduate program.[36]

Joint Bachelor's Degree with City University of Hong Kong[edit]

This highly selective program is open to top-ranked undergraduates enrolled at the City University of Hong Kong and allows graduates to receive two bachelor's degrees from the City University and Columbia in four years. Undergraduates spend their first two years at the City University and their final two years at Columbia, where they complete the Core Curriculum and choose one of 70 majors offered at Columbia.[37][38]

Joint Bachelor's Degree with Trinity College Dublin[edit]

The Joint Bachelor's Degree Program with Trinity College Dublin is a unique and highly selective program in which undergraduate students earn two Bachelor of Arts degrees in four years from both Columbia University and Trinity College Dublin (University of Dublin), an ancient university modeled after the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. Trinity College Dublin is the oldest university in Ireland and is widely considered to be its most prestigious institution. This program is geared towards traditionally-aged applicants in high school.[39]

Combined Plan with the School of Engineering and Applied Science[edit]

GS students are eligible for guaranteed admission to the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) through the Columbia Combined Plan program, under the condition that they complete the necessary pre-engineering courses. Students in the program receive a B.A. in a liberal arts discipline from GS and a B.S. in an engineering discipline from SEAS. Students may apply for the Combined Plan program in their junior (3-2 program) or senior (4-2) year of undergraduate study.

Notable alumni[edit]

An asterisk (*) indicates an alumnus who did not graduate.

Academia[edit]

  • Simon Kuznets (1923), Nobel Prize-winning economist.
  • Baruj Benacerraf (1942), Nobel Prize-winning immunologist.
  • Isaac Asimov (1939), science fiction writer and biochemist, professor of biochemistry
  • Allen Forte (1950), professor at Yale University, music theorist and musicologist
  • Jehuda Reinharz (1964), President of Brandeis University
  • Edward Cecil Harris (1971), Creator of the Harris matrix.
  • Roger Pilon (1971), Constitutional scholar and legal theorist.
  • Alfred Appel (1959), scholar on Vladimir Nabokov.

Politics[edit]

  • Philippe Reines (2000), Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs and Senior Advisor to Secretary of StateHillary Rodham Clinton.
  • Patrick Gaspard* (1994–1997), current United States Ambassador to South Africa, White House Political Affairs Director for U.S. PresidentBarack Obama, former Executive Director of the Democratic National Committee
  • Mike Gravel (1956), Former United States Senator from Alaska and candidate for the 2008 Democratic nomination for President of the United States. Released full Pentagon Papers.
  • Howard Dean (1975), Former Governor of Vermont and Chairman of the Democratic National Committee.
  • Peter H. Kostmayer (1971), United States Congressman from Pennsylvania.
  • Seymour Halpern (1934), United States Congressman from New York
  • Gale Brewer (1997), 27th Borough president of Manhattan
  • Stewart Rawlings Mott (1959), Lobbyist and Philanthropist
  • Patricia Robinson (1955), First Lady of Trinidad and Tobago from 1997 to 2003

Literature and arts[edit]

  • J. D. Salinger* (1939), Writer, The Catcher in the Rye
  • Federico García Lorca* (1929), Spanish poet and dramatist; influential member of the Generation of '27
  • Barbara Probst Solomon (1960), American author, essayist and journalist
  • Louis Simpson (1948), Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet
  • Ingrid Bengis (1996), American writer
  • Sasha Frere-Jones (1993), American writer, music critic, and musician
  • Ted Rall (1991), Syndicated cartoonist, president of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists from 2008 to 2009
  • Simi Linton (1977), author, consultant, public speaker who focuses on disability studies
  • Edward Klein (1960), Author.
  • Kevin Brown* (1990), biographer, essayist, translator
  • Joy Leftow (1983), poet, fiction writer, essayist
  • Mykola Dementiuk (1984), American author; twice winner of the Lambda Literary Award
  • Lee Siegel (1980s), cultural critic
  • Cecil Brown (1966), African American writer and educator
  • John Rousmaniere (1967), American sailor, author on sailing and yachting history
  • Castle Freeman, Jr. (1968), author, Go with Me; contributor to Old Farmer's Almanac
  • Raymond Federman (1957), French–American novelist and academic; author, Double or Northing
  • Hunter S. Thompson*, (1958). Writer.
  • Herbert Kuhner (1959), Austrian writer and translator
  • Donald Clarence Judd (1953), Artist.
  • Dolores Dembus Bittleman (1952), American fiber artist
  • Alexandra Ansanelli (2010-), American ballet dancer for The Royal Ballet

Technology and entrepreneurship[edit]

Activism[edit]

Music[edit]

  • Ira Gershwin* (1918), Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer.
  • Leonard Cohen* (1957), Musician and poet
  • Jason Everman (2013), former member of Nirvana, Soundgarden, the Army Rangers, and Green Berets
  • Gil Shaham (1990), Violinist.
  • Lena Park (2010), Korean-American singer
  • Robin Pecknold (2016), American musician and frontman of Seattle indie folk band Fleet Foxes
  • Pat Boone (1957), Singer and actor.
  • Tamar Kaprelian (2016), Singer.

Film and entertainment[edit]

  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt* (2000–2004), American actor and director
  • Robert Sean Leonard*, American actor
  • Jonathan Taylor Thomas (2010), Actor.
  • Kristi Zea (1974), Academy Award-winning producer, As Good as It Gets
  • David O. Selznick* (1923), Hollywood producer, King Kong, Gone with the Wind
  • Telly Savalas (1946), Actor, Emmy-award winner and Oscar nominee.
  • Sarah Ramos (2013-), American actress, American Dreams, Parenthood
  • Eric Shaw (2003), Emmy Award-winning writer for SpongeBob SquarePants
  • Ossie Davis (1948), Actor and social activist, Emmy- and Golden Globe-award nominee.
  • Adriana Ferreyr (2011-), Brazilian film, television and stage actress, Marisol
  • Julia Bacha (2003), Brazilian documentary maker, director of Budrus
  • Larysa Kondracki (2001), Canadian film director, The Whistleblower
  • Donald Richie (1953), Film Critic.
  • Anthony Perkins* (1950s), Actor and writer.
  • Frank Sutton (1952), actor, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Media[edit]

  • R. W. Apple (1961), The New York Times associate editor.
  • James S. Vlasto (1950s), American editor, public relations consultant for Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. and Herman Badillo; press secretary for Governor of New YorkHugh Carey; father of Chris Vlasto, executive producer of Good Morning America
  • Jacques Pepin (1970), internationally recognized French chef, TV personality, dean at the International Culinary Center
  • Mary Helen Bowers (2008), celebrity fitness guru, entrepreneur, former New York City Ballet dancer
  • Ray William Johnson* (2008), YouTube celebrity best known for his show "Equals Three"
  • Trish Regan (2000), Fox Business Network anchor
  • Steve Hofstetter (2002), comedian, host, and executive producer of "Laughs" on Fox television stations
  • Erik Courtney (2000) Bravo TV personality Newlyweds: The First Year
  • Mark Rotella (1992), senior editor at Publishers Weekly
  • John Horgan (journalist) (1982), American science journalist, known for his 1996 book, The End of Science
  • Howard G. Chua-Eoan (1983), News Director, Time.
  • Malcolm Borg (1965), Chairman of North Jersey Media Group (formerly Macromedia, Inc.) owner of The Record (Bergen County)
  • Eytan Schwartz (2001), Israeli Reality television personality
  • Matt Sanchez (2007), journalist and former Marine reservist

Athletics[edit]

  • Red Auerbach* (1937–39), legendary basketball coach of the Washington Capitols, Tri-Cities Blackhawks, and general manager of the Boston Celtics
  • Kimberly Navarro (2004), ice dancer, 2008 & 2009 U.S. bronze medalist and 2008 Four Continents bronze medalist.
  • Trent Dimas (2002), Olympic champion gymnast
  • Gillian Wachsman (1994), former skater; 1985 NHK Trophy champion and 1986 U.S. national champion
  • Sandy Koufax* (1955), Hall of Fame pitcher for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers
  • Troy Murphy (2015), former NBA player

Fashion[edit]

Miscellaneous[edit]

Notable students currently[when?] attending the School of General Studies[edit]

  • Adriana Ferreyr (2011-), Brazilian actress
  • Lipa Schmeltzer (2014-), American Jewish singer, entertainer writer, and composer
  • Abby Stein (2014-), American transgender activist, Blogger, and speaker.
  • Grace Phipps (2016-), American actress
  • Ayesha Kapur (2016-), Indian actress
  • Michelle Page (2016-), American actress
  • Tiiu Kuik (2016-), Estonian fashion model

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°48′33″N73°57′47″W / 40.809163°N 73.962941°W / 40.809163; -73.962941

Lewisohn Hall at Columbia University, home to the School of General Studies

WRIT UN1001 Beginning Fiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning workshop in fiction is designed for students with little or no experience writing literary texts in fiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. The focus of the course is on the rudiments of voice, character, setting, point of view, plot, and lyrical use of language.  Students will begin to develop the critical skills that will allow them to read like writers and understand, on a technical level, how accomplished creative writing is produced. Outside readings of a wide range of fiction supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

WRIT UN1100 Beginning Fiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning workshop in fiction is designed for students with little or no experience writing literary texts in fiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. The focus of the course is on the rudiments of voice, character, setting, point of view, plot, and lyrical use of language.  Students will begin to develop the critical skills that will allow them to read like writers and understand, on a technical level, how accomplished creative writing is produced. Outside readings of a wide range of fiction supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1100001/70290T 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Jarret Leong310/15
WRIT 1100002/23195Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Madelaine Lucas313/15
WRIT 1100003/14818Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Catherine Powell313/15
WRIT 1100004/74705M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Yin Ren312/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1100001/11908Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Tyler Curtis39/15
WRIT 1100002/28622Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Theresa Hottel315/15
WRIT 1100003/15984T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Maria Nicola Lo Sebastian315/15
WRIT 1100004/75749T 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Sihan Tan313/15

WRIT UN1101 Beginning Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with little or no experience in writing literary nonfiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually submit their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

WRIT UN1200 Beginning Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with little or no experience in writing literary nonfiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually submit their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1200001/62637W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Georgette Mallory39/15
WRIT 1200002/27452W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
502 Northwest Corner
Kalle Mattila314/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1200001/61178Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Moeko Fujii313/15
WRIT 1200002/22728M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Trenton Pollard312/15

WRIT UN1201 Beginning Poetry Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning poetry workshop is designed for students who have a serious interest in poetry writing but who lack a significant background in the rudiments of the craft and/or have had little or no previous poetry workshop experience. Students will be assigned weekly writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, tone, irony, and others. Students will also read an extensive variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

WRIT UN1300 Beginning Poetry Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The beginning poetry workshop is designed for students who have a serious interest in poetry writing but who lack a significant background in the rudiments of the craft and/or have had little or no previous poetry workshop experience. Students will be assigned weekly writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, tone, irony, and others. Students will also read an extensive variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1300001/63865W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Lily Blacksell314/15
WRIT 1300002/70604M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Anne Brink314/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 1300001/67873Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Rashida Williams318/15

WRIT UN2001 Intermediate Fiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Intermediate workshops are for students with some experience with creative writing, and whose prior work merits admission to the class (as judged by the professor).  Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops, and increased expectations to produce finished work.  By the end of the semester, each student will have produced at least seventy pages of original fiction.  Students are additionally expected to write extensive critiques of the work of their peers.

WRIT UN2100 Intermediate Fiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Intermediate workshops are for students with some experience with creative writing, and whose prior work merits admission to the class (as judged by the professor).  Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops, and increased expectations to produce finished work.  By the end of the semester, each student will have produced at least seventy pages of original fiction.  Students are additionally expected to write extensive critiques of the work of their peers.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2100001/24623Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
504 Dodge Building
Leopoldine Core315/15
WRIT 2100002/74854Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Heidi Julavits315/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2100001/60528Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Kathleen Alcott314/15
WRIT 2100002/20384M 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Patricia Cottrell317/15

WRIT UN2101 Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

The intermediate workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with some experience in writing literary nonfiction. Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops and an expectation that students will produce finished work. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects. By the end of the semester, students will have produced thirty to forty pages of original work in at least two traditions of literary nonfiction.

WRIT UN2110 Fiction Seminar: Approaches to the Short Story.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The modern short story has gone through many transformations, and the innovations of its practitioners have often pointed the way for prose fiction as a whole. The short story has been seized upon and refreshed by diverse cultures and aesthetic affiliations, so that perhaps the only stable definition of the form remains the famous one advanced by Poe, one of its early masters, as a work of fiction that can be read in one sitting. Still, common elements of the form have emerged over the last century and this course will study them, including Point of View, Plot, Character, Setting, and Theme. John Hawkes once famously called these last four elements the "enemies of the novel," and many short story writers have seen them as hindrances as well. Hawkes later recanted, though some writers would still agree with his earlier assessment, and this course will examine the successful strategies of great writers across the spectrum of short story practice, from traditional approaches to more radical solutions, keeping in mind how one period's revolution - Hemingway, for example - becomes a later era's mainstream or "common-sense" storytelling mode. By reading the work of major writers from a writer's perspective, we will examine the myriad techniques employed for what is finally a common goal: to make readers feel. Short writing exercises will help us explore the exhilarating subtleties of these elements and how the effects created by their manipulation or even outright absence power our most compelling fictions.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2110001/60085T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Samuel Lipsyte315/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2110001/69349W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Hermione Buckland-Hoby316/15

WRIT UN2200 Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

The intermediate workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with some experience in writing literary nonfiction. Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops and an expectation that students will produce finished work. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects. By the end of the semester, students will have produced thirty to forty pages of original work in at least two traditions of literary nonfiction.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2200001/22509W 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Sarah Broom313/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2200001/61320W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
652 Schermerhorn Hall
John Vincler311/15

WRIT UN2201 Intermediate Poetry Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Intermediate poetry workshops are for students with some prior instruction in the rudiments of poetry writing and prior poetry workshop experience. Intermediate poetry workshops pose greater challenges to students and maintain higher critical standards than beginning workshops. Students will be instructed in more complex aspects of the craft, including the poetic persona, the prose poem, the collage, open-field composition, and others. They will also be assigned more challenging verse forms such as the villanelle and also non-European verse forms such as the pantoum. They will read extensively, submit brief critical analyses, and put their instruction into regular practice by composing original work that will be critiqued by their peers. By the end of the semester each student will have assembled a substantial portfolio of finished work.

WRIT UN2211 Nonfiction Seminar: Traditions in Nonfiction.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

The seminar provides exposure to the varieties of nonfiction with readings in its principal genres: reportage, criticism and commentary, biography and history, and memoir and the personal essay.  A highly plastic medium, nonfiction allows authors to portray real events and experiences through narrative, analysis, polemic or any combination thereof.  Free to invent everything but the facts, great practitioners of nonfiction are faithful to reality while writing with a voice and a vision distinctively their own.  To show how nonfiction is conceived and constructed, class discussions will emphasize the relationship of content to form and style, techniques for creating plot and character under the factual constraints imposed by nonfiction, the defining characteristics of each author's voice, the author's subjectivity and presence, the role of imagination and emotion, the uses of humor, and the importance of speculation and attitude.  Written assignments will be opportunities to experiment in several nonfiction genres and styles.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2211001/13709M 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Mark Rozzo313/15

WRIT UN2300 Intermediate Poetry Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Intermediate poetry workshops are for students with some prior instruction in the rudiments of poetry writing and prior poetry workshop experience. Intermediate poetry workshops pose greater challenges to students and maintain higher critical standards than beginning workshops. Students will be instructed in more complex aspects of the craft, including the poetic persona, the prose poem, the collage, open-field composition, and others. They will also be assigned more challenging verse forms such as the villanelle and also non-European verse forms such as the pantoum. They will read extensively, submit brief critical analyses, and put their instruction into regular practice by composing original work that will be critiqued by their peers. By the end of the semester each student will have assembled a substantial portfolio of finished work.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2300001/18027W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Anais Duplan310/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 2300001/70295W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Diana Delgado313/15

WRIT UN2310 Poetry Seminar: Approaches to Poetry.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

One advantage of writing poetry within a rich and crowded literary tradition is that there are many poetic tools available out there, stranded where their last practitioners dropped them, some of them perhaps clichéd and overused, yet others all but forgotten or ignored.  In this class, students will isolate, describe, analyze, and put to use these many tools, while attempting to refurbish and contemporize them for the new century.  Students can expect to imitate and/or subvert various poetic styles, voices, and forms, to invent their own poetic forms and rules, to think in terms of not only specific poetic forms and metrics, but of overall poetic architecture (lineation and diction, repetition and surprise, irony and sincerity, rhyme and soundscape), and finally, to leave those traditions behind and learn to strike out in their own direction, to write -- as poet Frank O'Hara said -- on their own nerve.

WRIT UN2311 Poetry Seminar: Traditions in Poetry.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

Lyric poetry in contemporary practice continues to draw upon and modify its ancient sources, as well as Renaissance, Romantic and Modernist traditions.  In this seminar, we will explore the creation of the voice of the poem, the wild lyrical I, through closely reading female poets from antiquity to present day, beginning with Anne Carson's translations of Sappho, If Not Winter, all the way up to present avatars and noted sylists such as Mary Jo Bang (Elegy), Traci K. Smith (Life on Mars), Bernadette Mayer (New Directions Reader), Eileen Myles (Not Me), Maggie Nelson (Bluets) and others.  The identity of the poetic speaker remains with inescapable ties to memory and experience as one mode of the lyric, and with the dramatic topes of mask and persona as another.  Students will be asked to hear a range of current and classic women poets deploying, constructing and annihilating the self: the sonnets of Queen Elizabeth and the American beginnings of Anne Bradstreet; the emergence in the 19th century of iconic and radicalizing female presences: Emily Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Christina Rossetti, Elizabeth Barrett Browning; and the predominance of 20th century masters who re-invented the English-language lyric as much as they inherited: Louise Bogan, Gwendolyn Brooks, H.D., Marianne Moore, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Laura Riding, and Gertrude Stein.  As background, students will read prose works (epistolary, writing, journals and diaries, classic essays as well as prose poetry), which may contextualize women's desire and its reception in public and private space: the religious mysticism of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Dorothy Wordsworth's journals, Emily Dickinson's letters, and Virginia Woolf's criticism and novels.  Students will be expected to keep their own reading diary or write letters in response to class readings, as well as select a classic and contemporary female poet for semester-long research.  Additional course handouts will be organized by particular groupings of interest to our study of desire & identity, voice & witness:  Confessional poetry (Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton), Cave Canem poets (Harryette Mullen and Natasha Trethway), New York School (Alice Notley and Hannah Weiner), as well as additional contemporary poets (Lyn Melnick and Matthea Harvey).

WRIT UN3010 Cross Genre Seminar: Short Prose Forms.3 points.

Note: This seminar has a workshop component.

Prerequisites: No Prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

"Flash fiction," "micro-naratives" and the "short-short" have become exciting areas of exploration for contemporary writers.  This course will examine how these literary fragments have captured the imagination of writers internationally and at home.  The larger question the class seeks to answer, both on a collective and individual level, is: How can we craft a working definition of those elements endemic to "short prose" as a genre?  Does the form exceed classification?  What aspects of both crafts -- prose and poetry -- does this genre inhabit, expand upon, reinvent, reject, subvert? Short Prose Forms incorporates aspects of both literary seminar and the creative workshop.  Class-time will be devoted alternatingly to examinations of published pieces and modified discussions of student work.  Our reading chart the course from the genre's emergence, examining the prose poem in 19th-century France through the works of Mallarme, Baudelaire, Max Jacob and Rimbaud.  We'll examine aspects of poetry -- the attention to the lyrical, the use of compression, musicality, sonic resonances and wit -- and attempt to understand how these writers took, as Russell Edson describes, "experience [and] made it into an artifact with the logic of a dream."  The class will conclude with a portfolio at the end of the term, in which students will submit a compendium of final drafts of three of four short prose pieces, samples of several exercises, selescted responses to readings, and a short personal manifesto on the "short prose form.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3010001/66234Th 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Alan Ziegler315/15

WRIT UN3011 Translation Seminar.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Students do not need to demonstrate bilingual ability to take this course. Department approval NOT needed.
Corequisites: This course is open to undergraduate & graduate students.

This course will explore broad-ranging questions pertaining to the historical, cultural, and political significance of translation while analyzing the various challenges confronted by the art's foremost practitioners.  We will read and discuss texts by writers and theorists such as Benjamin, Derrida, Borges, Steiner, Dryden, Nabokov, Schleiermacher, Goethe, Spivak, Jakobson, and Venuti.  As readers and practitioners of translation, we will train our ears to detect the visibility of invisibility of the translator's craft; through short writing experiments, we will discover how to identify and capture the nuances that traverse literary styles, historical periods and cultures.  The course will culminate in a final project that may either be a critical analysis or an original translation accompanied by a translator's note of introduction.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3011001/15652T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Elianna Kan39/15

WRIT UN3013 Cross-Genre Seminar: Process Writing & Writing Process.3 points.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites not required. Departmental approval NOT required.

The act of writing is often mythologized, romanticized, or dismissed as peripheral to the text itself. This course will address the process as a primary lens for looking at art, focusing on literature that explicitly investigates the experience of its creation. Readings will include writings by visual artists who produce documents of performances, surrealists who use "automatic" methods to reveal the unconscious, poets who seek to capture states of enlightenment or intoxication, and novelists who employ extreme conditions to achieve unexpected results. For the class, students will experiement with their environment, lifestyle, and methods to increase their awareness of how everything they do can affect what appears on the page.

WRIT UN3016 Cross Genre Seminar: Walking.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

As Walter Benjamin notes in The Arcades Project: "Basic to flanerie, among other things, is the idea that the fruits of idleness are more precious than the fruits of labor.  The flaneur, as is well known, makes 'studies'."  This course will encourage you to make "studies" -- poems, essays, stories, or multimedia pieces -- based on your walks.  We will read depictions of walking from multiple disciplines, including philosophy, poetry, history, religion, visual art, and urban planning.  Occasionally we will walk together.  An important point of the course is to develop mobile forms of writing.  How can writing emerge from, and document, a walk's encounters, observations, and reflections?  What advantages does mobility bring to our work?  Each week you will write a short piece (1-3 pages) that engages your walks while responding to close readings of the assigned material. 

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3016001/69570Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
John Cotner315/15

WRIT UN3044 Imaginative Writing.3 points.

Prerequisites: Suggested preparation: Structure and Style I and II.

Students should, if possible, submit a writing sample (5-10 pages of poetry or fiction) to the instructor before the first class meeting.

WRIT UN3083 LITERARY EDITING & PUBLIS.0 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

WRIT UN3100 Advanced Fiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Building on the work of the Intermediate Workshop, Advanced Workshops are reserved for the most accomplished creative writing students. A significant body of writing must be produced and revised.  Particular attention will be paid to the components of fiction: voice, perspective, characterization, and form.  Students will be expected to finish several short stories, executing a total artistic vision on a piece of writing. The critical focus of the class will include an examination of endings and formal wholeness, sustaining narrative arcs, compelling a reader's interest for the duration of the text, and generating a sense of urgency and drama in the work.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3100001/28036W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Jennifer George39/15
WRIT 3100002/72270T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
504 Dodge Building
Alexandra Kleeman314/15
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3100001/68456W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Marie Lee313/15
WRIT 3100002/17917W 10:10am - 12:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Hilary Leichter315/15

WRIT UN3101 Senior Fiction Workshop.4 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course.  Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor.  The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major.  Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work.  In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3101001/10148T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Mitchell Jackson414/12
Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3101001/13909M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Sarah Gerard411/12

WRIT UN3117 Fiction Seminar: The Here & Now.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

In this course, we will read a wide variety of short fiction that concerns itself with the clarification and magnification of particular moments of being.  An emphasis will be placed on how these writers notice things that others might overlook-- the small, the peculiar, the unexpected-- and then how they transform these seemingly modest things with the force of their attention.  Our goal will be to proceed through these stories at the level of the sentence.  Why this quiet pulling back?  Much of our discussion will center on why a specific (and at times mysterious-seeming) choice has abeen made by an author.  But we will also from time to time broaden our focus to encompass larger philosophical concerns that are triggered by these questions of craft. We will talk about the science of attention, false and true lyricism, "the discipline of rightness" (as Wallace Stevens once described it) and why it is that feeling so often precedes form.  We will not spend very much time exploring the thematic concerns of these stories.  Nor will we speak in great detail about whether we find contained within them sympathetic or unsympathetic characters.  Instead, the aim of this class will be to analyze the formal elements of fiction with an eye towards refining our own prose styles and towards saying more clearly how it happened that a given text did or did not move us.

WRIT UN3120 Fiction Seminar: The Craft Of Writing Dialogue.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Departmental approval NOT required.

Whether texting, chatting, conversing, speechifying, recounting, confiding, gossiping, tweeting, praying, interviewing, exhorting, pitching, scheming, lecturing, nagging or begging, humans love to talk, and readers love narratives that contain dialogue.  Good dialogue makes characters and scenes feel real and alive.  Great dialogue reveals characters' fears, desires and quirks, forwards the narrative's plot and dramatic tension, and often contains subtext.  In this course, we'll read different kinds of novels and stories -- from noir to horror to sci-fi to realistice drama to comic romp -- that implement various types of dialogue effectively, and we'll study how to do it.  We'll read essays by masters that explain techniques for writing great dialogue, and we'll practice writing different styles of dialogue ourselves.  Coursework will consist of reading, in-class exercises, and two short creative assignments.

WRIT UN3121 Fiction Seminar: How To Build A Person.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Departmental approval NOT required.

Character is something that good fiction supposedly cannot do without.  But what is a character, and what constitutes a supposedly good or believable one?  Should characters be like people we know, and if so, how exactly do we create written versions of people?  This class will examine characters in all sorts of writing, historical and contemporary, with an eye toward understanding just how characters are created in fiction, and how they come to seem real to us.  We'll read stories and novels; we may also look at essays and biographical writing to analyze where the traces of personhood reside.  We'll also explore the way in which these same techniques of writing allow us to personify entities that lack traditional personhood, such as animals, computers, and other nonhuman characters.  Does personhood precede narrative, or is it something we bestow on others by allowing them to tell their story or by telling a story of our own creation on their behalf?  Weekly critical and creative exercises will intersect with and expand on the readings and discussions. 

WRIT UN3122 First Novels: How They Work.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

First Novels exist as a distinct category, in part, because all novelists must write one.  They may never write a second, but in order to be called novelists there always has to be a first.  As a result the first novel is a very special animal.  Every kind of writer must attempt one and despite vast differences in genre or style there are often many similarities between them.  In fact, one of the surest similarities are the flaws in each book.  Before each writer becomes an expert at his or her method, his or her style, there is room for experimentation and unsuccessful attempts. These "failures" are often much more illuminating for students than the successes of later books.  First novels contain the energy of youth, but often lack the precision that comes with maturity.  By examining a series of first novels students will learn to identify common craft elements of first novels and how to employ them to great effect in their own writing.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3122001/27008W 12:10pm - 2:00pm
516 Hamilton Hall
Victor Lavalle323/15

WRIT UN3123 An Earnest Look At Irony.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

In this seminar, we will examine works by several accomplished writers of fiction, and a few crackerjack poets, in order to determine what, precisely, we mean when we talk about irony on the page and what, precisely, we mean when we talk about earnestness. How are these very different effects (and affects) achieved? What are their benefits to the student author? What pitfalls, perceived or otherwise, attend the allure of each? What is the relationship of humor to earnestness, and of seriousness to irony? Is the absence of irony really the same thing as earnestness? Does the absence of earnestness somehow necessitate irony? With an eye toward technique, we will attempt to answer these and further questions by time spent among the words of those who fall along, though often refuse to stay put on, the earnest-ironic continuum. Students will be expected to write three stories or essays throughout the semester, exploring for themselves this treacherous but eminently skiable slope. With readings from Robert Frost, Stevie Smith, Charles Baudelaire, Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), James Joyce, Raymond Carver, James Baldwin, Vladimir Nabokov, Joan Didion, Donald Barthelme, George Saunders, Virginia Woolf, Zadie Smith, Gertrude Stein, Jamaica Kincaid, Jame Agee, Isak Dinsen, David Foster Wallace, Clarice Lispector, and Paul West.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3123001/63012M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Ben Metcalf315/15

WRIT UN3124 The Competitive Body: Literary Portrayals of Sports and Athleticism.3 points.


Fee: Course Fee - 15.00

Competitive sport dominates much of modern American life, yet it has been largely neglected as a subject for literature. Roland Barthes suggests that there may be a fundamental incompatibility between athletes and intellectuals, while sports journalist Robert Lipsyte has spent a career elaborating upon his popular taxonomy of “jocks” and “pukes.” Lingering notions of Cartesian dualism undoubtedly contribute to this divide, as well as increasing skepticism towards the binary win-lose logic of sport. Art’s tendency to complicate rather than simplify, to intimate rather than prescribe, seems at odds with the easy trajectory that sport provides. Mirroring the structure of competitive contests, all stories necessarily end in victory or defeat.


The radical feminist writer Kathy Acker frames the struggle to write about sport somewhat differently. In “Against Ordinary Language,” her essay on bodybuilding, Acker wonders whether the split is not between camps of people, but rather between languages. How do we articulate a language that is speechless? How do we “read” and “write” the figures that the body makes through space? How do we derive meaning from an activity that is, etymologically-speaking, useless, frivolous, and inconsequential?


This course will be preoccupied with the above questions. The literary texts we will read and discuss are essentially texts of translation that bring the language of the body onto the page. We will read works of literary fiction as well as critical essays and sports histories. Taken together, these texts will illuminate different ways to “read” sport—as portrait, as metaphor, as metonym. We will also learn how to contextualize sport within the larger political, economic, and social systems in which we are all players. 

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3124001/84280M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
308a Lewisohn Hall
Anelise Chen311/15

WRIT UN3125 Apocalypses Now.3 points.

Not offered during 2017-18 academic year.

From ancient myths of the world’s destruction to cinematic works that envision a post-apocalyptic reality, zealots of all kinds have sought an understanding of “the end of the world as we know it.”  But while apocalyptic predictions have, so far, failed to deliver a real glimpse of that end, in fiction they abound.  In this course, we will explore the narrative mechanisms by which post-apocalyptic works create projections of our own world that are believably imperiled, realistically degraded, and designed to move us to feel differently and act differently within the world we inhabit.  We will consider ways in which which authors craft immersive storylines that maintain a vital allegorical relationship to the problems of the present, and discuss recent trends in contemporary post-apocalyptic fiction.  How has the genre responded to our changing conception of peril?  Is literary apocalyptic fiction effective as a vehicle for persuasion and for showing threats in a new light?  Ultimately, we will inquire into the possibility of thinking beyond our present moment and, by doing so, altering our fate.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3125001/67746T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
508 Lewisohn Hall
Alexandra Kleeman317/15

WRIT UN3200 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

Advanced Nonfiction Workshop is for students with significant narrative and/or critical experience. Students will produce original literary nonfiction for the workshop, with an added focus on developing a distinctive voice and approach.

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3200001/14326T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
963 Ext Schermerhorn Hall
Kate Zambreno315/15

WRIT UN3201 Senior Nonfiction Workshop.3 points.

Prerequisites: The department's permission required through writing sample. Please go to 609 Kent for submission schedule and registration guidelines or see http://www.arts.columbia.edu/writing/undergraduate.

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Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3201001/66016Th 12:10pm - 2:00pm
606 Lewisohn Hall
Emily Gould312/12

WRIT UN3210 Nonfiction Seminar: The Modern Arts Writer.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required.

We will examine the lineaments of critical writing. A critic blends the subjective and objective in complex ways. A critic must know the history of an artwork, its past, while placing it on the contemporary landscape and contemplating its future. A single essay will analyze, argue, describe, reflect, and interpret. And, since examining a work of art also means examining oneself, the task includes a willingness to probe one's own assumptions. The best critics are engaged in a conversation -- a dialogue, a debate -- with changing standards of taste, with their audience, with their own convictions and emotions. The best criticism is part of a larger cultural conversation. It spurs readers to ask questions rather than accept answers about art and society. We will read essays that consider six art forms: literature; film; music (classical, jazz and popular); theatre and performance; visual art; and dance. At the term's end, students will consider essays that examine cultural boundaries and divisions: the negotiations between popular and high art; the aesthetic of cruelty; the post-modern blurring of and between artist, critic and fan. The reading list will include such writers as Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Elizabeth Hardwick (literature); James Agee, Manny Farber, Zadie Smith (film); G.B. Shaw, Willa Cather, Ralph Ellison, Lester Bangs, Ellen Willis (music); Eric Bentley, Mary McCarthy, C.L.R. James (theatre); Leo Steinberg, Frank O'Hara, Ada Louise Huxtable, Maggie Nelson (visual art); Edwin Denby, Arlene Croce, Elizabeth Kendall, Mindy Aloff (dance); Susan Sontag, Anthony Heilbut, John Jeremiah Sullivan (cultural criticism).

Course NumberSection/Call NumberTimes/LocationInstructorPointsEnrollment
WRIT 3210001/12742T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
511 Kent Hall
Margo Jefferson313/15

WRIT UN3211 Nonfiction Seminar: The Lyric Essay.3 points.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed.

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