A Child Of The Jago Analysis Essay

Morrison's Narrative Revolution In Postmodernism Essay

Challenging existing perceptions of narrative authority is a common writing practice amongst authors. While Morrison works to reassess the role of the narrative voice, she does so in an unconventional manner. In her novel Jazz, Morrison draws attention to the unreliability of the narrator through her1 inconsistency and bias. Morrison's flawed narrator helps connect her book to postmodernist African-American themes. By restructuring the narrative role within the book, Morrison makes her book Jazz a postmodernist text.
Morrison initially creates an unreliable narrator through the inconsistency of the narrative voice. Because Morrison does not reveal the identity of the narrator until the end of the novel, everything known about her prior is revealed through her “personality” that comes through in the telling of the story. The acquainting process is complicated by the continual shift in the narrative personality. Frequently, the narrator speaks from the perspective of a communal voice, but also shifts into a more personal register. In one of her rare breaks into a more personal tone, the narrator explains “People say I should come out more”, but this one of the few times she speaks about any sort of relationship to other people ( Morrison 7). Usually, the narrator adopts an omnipresent, removed persona. The breaking of this persona throughout the novel contributes to an unpredictable way that the narrator has of presenting herself in relationship to the text. There are other variances in the narrative personality outside of persona changes. Much like the inconsistency of the narrative style in the story, the narrator frequently changes mood and the way she relates to the characters. Because of the discordant attitudes of the narrator, her credibility is weakened.
While Morrison subtly undermines the narrator through her capricious behavior, the narrator also undermines herself. The narrator is privy to information about the background story of each character and even their inner thoughts, despite her unclear relationship to them or any rationalization as to why she would know all of this information. When introducing Violet's character, she speculates “Maybe that is why Violet is a hairdresser-all those years of listening to her rescuing grandmother, True Belle, tell Baltimore stories” (Morrison 17). The usage of the word “maybe” implies that the narrator is not certain about her assertion, but feels it is necessary to include in order to explain how she sees Violet's character. Speculations influence the portrayal of both the characters and their relationship to the past, a bold narrative step. The narrator herself admits doubt in her narration, saying “I am uneasy now. Feeling a bit false.” when self-reflecting on the story (Morrison 219 ). Morrison shows that the narrator continually makes up back stories and doubts her own authenticity as a storyteller. By making the narrator unreliable, Morrison forms a narrator that can neither be...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Postmodernity: Societal Changes Essay

2553 words - 10 pages As the term postmodernity suggests, it follows on from modernity therefore, to understand postmodernity, we must first understand the concepts of modernity and modernism. Once this is achieved, we can then examine whether present western society is or is not post-modern and what societal changes have led to the development of this debate. Therefore, modernity and its’ key features will be considered first, followed by an examination of the term...

Postmodernism in Latin America Essay

715 words - 3 pages Postmodernism in Latin America Postmodernism is the 19th and 20th century reaction against the previously dominant western foundationalism, or modernism. Foundationalism is rooted in classic Cartesian philosophy: ontologically, an objective reality exists independent of our perception of this reality and we can gain access to it if our theories are logically based on some indubitable foundation. For Descartes, this indubitable,...

Postmodernism

650 words - 3 pages Postmodernism The 20th Century, in many ways, can be remembered as a time of scientific and technological revolution. The innovations and rapid growth in many areas of technology have cast doubt upon words such as ignorance and impossibility. This revolution also instigated new and/or radical ideas in the world of academia. The growth of post-modernism and its adherers in historical circles have caused quite a stir in dealing with the...

Primary Analysis on A Child Of The Jago

2309 words - 9 pages Arthur Morrison’s A Child of the Jago (1896) is intrinsically linked to the social class system and poverty. The novel is set and published during the late Victorian age, a period in which the working class experienced a relentless struggle against the harsh realities of social and working conditions. Moreover, in his paper The Working Class in Britain 1850-1939, John Benson highlights the disparities between the poor and the economy...

A Child of the Jago by Arthur Morrison

2222 words - 9 pages Arthur Morrison’s A Child of the Jago (1896) is intrinsically linked to the social class system and poverty. The novel is set and published during the late Victorian age, a period in which the working class experienced a relentless struggle against the harsh realities of social and working conditions. Moreover, in his paper The Working Class in Britain 1850-1939, John Benson highlights the disparities between the poor and the economy during the...

Postmodernism: Myths and Realities

1985 words - 8 pages Postmodernism: Myths and Realities A number of theorists and scholars have proclaimed that we now live in a postmodern world--a world better explained by theories and concepts different from those of the modern world dating from the Enlightenment and before. The theories and concepts of postmodernism are widely and prominently applied in adult education. So, how do postmodernists characterize postmodernism? What are the critics' critiques?...

Comparing the Role of the Ghost in Morrison's Beloved and Kingston's No Name Woman

1003 words - 4 pages The Symbolic Role of the Ghost in Morrison's Beloved and Kingston's No Name Woman The eponymous ghosts which haunt Toni Morrison's Beloved and Maxine Hong Kingston's "No Name Woman" (excerpted from The Woman Warrior) embody the consequence of transgressing societal boundaries through adultery and murder. While the wider thematic concerns of both books differ, however both authors use the ghost figure to represent a repressed historical past...

Use of the Fences Metaphor in Describing Racial Injustice

1659 words - 7 pages Use of the Fences Metaphor in Describing Racial Injustice in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the Song "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot", and August Wilson's Fences In today's world it is difficult for young people to get a good handle on the past. This is especially the case when talking about the history of African-Americans in the United States and the "consequences of racial injustice" which they...

"The Doors" and the Sixties

1575 words - 6 pages The sixties was a time of major political and social change in the western world. These changes were mainly driven by the youth of the time. Their parents had come from life in both the great depression of the early thirties as well as World War II, and were on a whole more conservative than their children which the younger generation mostly refuted. In the early sixties the electronic media, such as Television and radio, became an important...

Is Postmodernism a continuation or critique of Mod

3824 words - 15 pages Is Postmodernism a continuation or critique of Modernism ? Postmodernism can be seen as both a continuation and critique of modernism. The difficulty in presiding between a continuation and a critique is that postmodernism , as with modernism, has a scope wider than the arts alone. To answer the...

Postmodernism and Joyce Carol Oates

2009 words - 8 pages On PostmodernismFor my short essay I will focus on a postmodern reading of Joyce Carol Oates, "How I Contemplated the World from the Detroit House of Corrections and Began My Life Over Again." More precisely, as a postmodern text. Postmodernism refers to texts that reject...

'The Jago had got him, and it held him fast.'

In the worst of London's East End slums, in an area called the Jago, young Dicky Perrott is used to a life of poverty, crime, and violence. Gang warfare is the order of the day, deaths are commonplace, and thieving the only way to survive. At first Dicky dreams of becoming a High Mobsman - one of the aristocrats of Jago crime - but the efforts of Father Sturt to improve conditions offer him a different path. Dicky's journey takes him through a savage but colourful community of pickpockets and cosh-carriers, where the police only enter in threes, and where murder erupts with an unusual horror and intimacy.

Morrison's portrayal of the Victorian underclass and its underworld drew attention to the bleak prospects for children living in such surroundings, and it is a classic of slum-fiction. In this edition Peter Miles provides a rich contextual background to the creation of the novel, and the social debates to which it contributed.

ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “A Child Of The Jago Analysis Essay”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *